Category Archives: Publishing

Bob Moore: Hostile Territory is Almost Out

I’ve sent out ARC (Advanced Review Copies) to a few reviewers but you’ll probably get the book before they are done with the reviews. Right now, I’m waiting on a cover and on one final editing pass by my wife. If all goes to plan, Bob Moore: Hostile Territory will be in your hands by the end of next week. Also, if you don’t have it by the end of next week, it’ll be at least a month or two before you do as I’ll be in the midst of a move back to the United States from Christmas until…well, until we can get settled. So, cross your fingers that the cover comes through.

What the hell took so long

Okay, first of all, I’m sorry. Those of you that follow me on Twitter have been going crazy for the last few months. You’ve known the first draft of Hostile Territory was done months and months ago and have (by your emails and tweets) been wondering what I’ve been doing all this time. Well, time to reveal all. Continue reading

On Marketing Your Book on the Internet

Getting a book written and uploaded is only the first step. Self-publishing is a long, hard road. You’ve probably thought of creating your own blog (gee, I did) and telling your friends. But there are tons of other things to do that you may or may not have considered (many I wouldn’t recommend). But, let’s talk about them anyhow.

Let me start with the fact that a quick Google search will reveal that each and every one of these methods (and probably more) are a SURE-FIRE WAY TO GET NOTICED! The Internet declares it so. But the key for each of the different types of marketing is not the method, but how well you use it. I believe that the deciding factor in the success of each methodology is not the inherent strength, but how well that method compliments your personality. Continue reading

You are not J.A. Konrath (Neither am I)

You can’t swing a dead cat around a conversation of Self-Publishing and not hit a reference to J.A. Konrath. He is the poster-boy for success in Self-Publishing. Here’s some stories to get your all prepared for what will happen after you self-publish your first book:

Author JA Konrath Makes $100,000 In Three Weeks On Self-Pubbed Books

JA Konrath Kindle Sales: 30k Ebooks In 11 Months

JA Konrath Sells 276,112 Ebooks

If you’ve read any of his posts, you know that Konrath was already a published author before he went the self-published route. He had around 500,000 books in print before he uploaded his first book to Amazon. He’ll admit that he had a lot of advantages. He had an audience that was interested in finding more of his books. He was early to the game so he got a lot of free press (still does). On top of that, his “A Newbie’s Guide to Publishing” blog has a great name for Google searches and is one of the more popular blogs.

A piece of information that you may already know – You are not J.A. Konrath (neither am I). But that doesn’t mean there isn’t an upside to this fact. Read on to find out. Continue reading

iBooks2 and iBooks Author – What it Means for the Self-Pubbed Writer

So by now you’ve heard of the new update to iBooks and the new iBooks Author. There has been a lot of hand-wringing and complaining on both sides. As I’ve recently published a iBooks formatting guide, here are my thoughts. Now, as of this writing, I’m still trying to download the iBooks Author app so I can’t do a direct comparison (I’m sure it will be easier than using iTunes Connect but your level of control over the look of the document will be the deciding factor). Things you should know – iBooks Author is for Macs running Lion only. No PCs, no Macs with Snow Leopard. This is a bit limiting. Plus, the tool is really designed to create textbooks for the iPad. While it says you export your book to the regular iBookstore, it seems that the final destination for most of these books will be the new iTunes U (a textbook version of the iBookstore). For those of you that have asked me about how to deal with pictures in books, this seems to be the answer for you. A few more thoughts: Continue reading